Concept & coding by Sander Veenhof with open data advice and support from  Mark van der Net

Use this handy augmented reality app that visualises nearby privacy intrusions based on open data about surveillance cameras worldwide

Zero to Heroku with Flask

crowdhailer:

This week I tried my hand at some Python for the first time in a long time. The goal of this was to simply create a ‘Hello World!’ application on Heroku.

Linux Mint comes with Python as standard and this post will be entirely about working with Mint. The useful tools I set up are on the recommendation of ‘Two scoops of Django' and their chapter on environment setup.

image

Read More

Reblogged from Linux Mint

phoxbox:

Sat, 24 February 2007

SploitCast #020

In this episode Matt interviews Adam Laurie, a legend in the computer security field.  They discuss Laurie’s wide array of knowledge with topics that include RFID vulnerabilities, infrared, bluetooth, privacy, and his underground “ex-ministry of defense” secure hosting facilities called “The Bunker”.

https://archive.org/details/SploitcastArchive

Episode 20 MP3 here (archive’s is mislabeled )

Reblogged from Bit Bucket

OpenSSL Heartbeat (Heartbleed) Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0160) and its High-Level Mechanics

Reblogged from fuckyeahcyber-punk

Channelnomics.com
NSS Labs Hits Back at FireEye ‘Untruths’April 4th, 2014 | Author: Doug Woodburn A war of words has erupted between FireEye Inc. and an independent testing house that questioned the vendor’s ability to catch malware.NSS Labs handed FireEye (NASDAQ:FEYE) a “caution rating” in its first ever comparative analysis of breach detection systems (BDS) after its box scored a “below average” security effectiveness rating of 94.5.All but one of the other vendors tested scored more than 98, with Fortinet Inc., Sourcefire Inc. and Trend Micro Inc. all scoring 99 or more.NSS said its findings helps end users cut through the vendor marketing fluff in what is a “rapidly evolving” market.In a forceful blog, FireEye product boss Manish Gupta moved immediately to discredit NSS Labs’ findings, claiming its methodology was “severely flawed.” The FireEye product the NSS used wasn’t even fully functional, used an old version of its software and did not have access to its threat intelligence, Gupta said.But this was like a red rag to a bull for NSS Labs, whose founder Bob Walder last night responded with an equally robust blog designed to address “a number of untruths and misdirections” in Gupta’s missive.
read more

Channelnomics.com

NSS Labs Hits Back at FireEye ‘Untruths’
April 4th, 2014 | Author: Doug Woodburn

A war of words has erupted between FireEye Inc. and an independent testing house that questioned the vendor’s ability to catch malware.

NSS Labs handed FireEye (NASDAQ:FEYE) a “caution rating” in its first ever comparative analysis of breach detection systems (BDS) after its box scored a “below average” security effectiveness rating of 94.5.

All but one of the other vendors tested scored more than 98, with Fortinet Inc., Sourcefire Inc. and Trend Micro Inc. all scoring 99 or more.

NSS said its findings helps end users cut through the vendor marketing fluff in what is a “rapidly evolving” market.

In a forceful blog, FireEye product boss Manish Gupta moved immediately to discredit NSS Labs’ findings, claiming its methodology was “severely flawed.” The FireEye product the NSS used wasn’t even fully functional, used an old version of its software and did not have access to its threat intelligence, Gupta said.

But this was like a red rag to a bull for NSS Labs, whose founder Bob Walder last night responded with an equally robust blog designed to address “a number of untruths and misdirections” in Gupta’s missive.

read more